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Phits Insoles – custom orthotics
Phits Insoles – custom orthotics Image

Technical specifications:

Printed in PA12 using SLS technology.

Technology highlights:

Phits Insoles are the world’s first and only true translation of personal dynamic gait analysis parameters in a 3D-printed foot orthotic. 3D-printing enables RS Print to incorporate local stiffness and directional stiffness into the core of the orthotic. Too often, 3D-printing is used as a marketing gimmick in orthopedics, Phits insoles goes beyond that point to make mass customization a reality.

Information and use cases:

RS Print was founded in 2014 as a joint venture of Materialise and RSscan. The Phits Insoles brand was launched in 2015. Over 150 Phits experts in 20 countries are already improving thousands of people’s lives with Phits. The Phits experts network consists of podiatrists, orthopedic technicians, fysiotherapists, occupational medicine and specialized retail.

3D-printed knee protection on workwear trousers
3D-printed knee protection on workwear trousers Image

Technical specifications:

Centexbel printed unique knee protectors, designed by Artevelde University College, with TPU filament using FDM-technology onto workwear trousers.

Technology highlights:

By printing directly onto conventionally produced substrates, additional assembly steps can be avoided and unique products can be made. The design of the 3D-printed knee protector can be made person-specific (by body scanning) resulting in optimal comfort for the user. With the selection of the right 3D-printing materials and textiles good results can be obtained in terms of adhesion onto the textile and washing properties.

Information and use cases:

3D-printing directly onto textiles (or other substrates) is a rather new process ready to be introduced into the industry as an additional technology for various applications, e.g. tailormade reinforcements on textiles or specific connector parts. Further assembly steps can be avoided, smart devices can be integrated, other functionalities can be added, etc.

Via 3D-printing every piece can be customized easily. Further research is being conducted to optimize design & process parameters, to enlarge the scope of printable materials and technologies and for an optimal integration into current production processes.

Smart helmet with lattice structure for cushioning effect and auto-localisation
Smart helmet with lattice structure for cushioning effect and auto-localisation Image

Technical specifications:

3D-scanning of human head by Formando; 3D design and topology optimisation by Formando and Materialise; 3D-printed via HP Multi Jet Fusion in PA12 by 3iD.

Technology highlights:

The helmet is designed to perfectly fit the shape of the user’s skull by 3D-scanning and modelling. The inside of the helmet consists of a lattice structure, generated automatically by the Materialise Magics Structures Module and 3-matic Lightweight Structure Module, enabling you to convert a solid 3D model into a lightweight version. A lattice structure can be applied to reduce the weight of the design, or to reinforce it. Other advantages include: saving powder (raw materials), temperature control, design freedom and perfection.

The separated shells around the lattice structure create a cushioning effect, which is energy-absorbent and distributes the impact. Electronics have been built in to localise a person when he or she has fallen. The HP Multi Jet Fusion technology combines high-quality with low-cost production.

Information and use cases:

This is a conceptual helmet that resolves several issues in one go: the shape is custom-made for a comfortable fit; the shock absorption reduces head injuries as much as technically possible; the built-in electronics (with accelerometer and GPS) send an alarm signal to a control room when wearer has fallen. This helmet can be the perfect solution for people suffering from epilepsy or other falling diseases, or for operators working in high-risk environments.

Yuniku, the world’s first vision-centric 3D eyewear
Yuniku, the world’s first vision-centric 3D eyewear Image

Technical specifications:

3D-tailored eyewear is designed entirely around your face and your vision. Regular spectacles can be customized only to a certain degree. The frame and fitting are a given, and the lenses have to be adjusted to suit them. Yuniku, by contrast, uses a revolutionary vision-centric approach. Advanced software calculates the ideal position of the lenses in relation to our eyes, and then 3D-prints the frame accordingly. For the first time, you can enjoy the ultimate in optical precision, without compromising on style or fit.

Technology highlights, information and use cases:

In the highly competitive consumer goods industry, a finish can make all the difference. As more and more companies turn to Additive Manufacturing to make better products, stay ahead of the curve by choosing the best finish for your 3D-printed products. We offer you Materialise Luxura: a premium consumer-grade finish to ensure your product looks and feels like the winner that it is.

The Materialise Luxura finishing degree, available in a range of contemporary colors, is designed to deliver the ideal aesthetic, tactile feel and quality assurance for your product. Choose the finish your product needs to gain the maximum added value.

Pneumatic hand
Pneumatic hand Image

Technical specifications:

The pneumatic hand by Materialise is made up of the palm and wrist area which are printed in polyamide, and the fingers which are printed in flexible TPU by KU Leuven. The hand can grip objects using compressed air. The fingers are designed with an expandable (flexible) side and a non-expandable (rigid) side. When compressed air is applied one side expands and the other stays at the same length. As a result, the finger bends and flexes. The bellows have been designed for optimized flexing and minimized internal stresses. Internal air channels are incorporated into the hand and wrist to distribute the compressed air to the fingers.

Technology highlights:

The potential of the SLS technology was pushed to the limit in this case, in combination with TPU material. A very thin wall thickness of 1.2 mm is necessary to provide the necessary bending range for the fingers while maintaining air tightness. The pneumatic fingers showcase a flexible thermoplastic elastomer made from powder tuned for Laser Sintering and currently not commercially available for this technique. It shows higher stiffness than currently available Laser Sintering rubbers. Its properties are interesting for biomechanical and orthopedic applications.

Information and use cases:

New materials support the evolution of Additive Manufacturing to an established production technique for parts tailored to form and function. 30 years of experience in research and innovations on the combination of materials, hardware and software for Additive Manufacturing at KU Leuven proves to be a good way to change the manufacturing industry. Beyond-state-of-the-art research results in durable collaborations with industry and continuous innovation in AM. This rubber material is only one example of these tangible results. The flexible fingers are mainly used in industrial gripping applications (gripping parts with industrial automation robots in a factory assembly line) but other possible uses of these actuators include consumer-oriented (household) robots.

Made to measure Bantu shoe, based on biomechanical principles
Made to measure Bantu shoe, based on biomechanical principles Image

Technical specifications:

Selective Laser Sintering technology in Polyamide (PA).

Technology highlights:

Handcrafted shoe production and 3D-printing have a lot in common: its use of materials and time and its focus on the individual. After scanning a person’s feet ‘a made to measure’ shoe is printed in specific 3D-printed material. The link with the indigenous counterpart, a Bantu shoe made out of vegetable tanned buffalo hide, is clear both in aesthetics and in biomechanical properties. A full analysis of the indigenous model that served as main inspiration was published and is freely available under DOI:10.1002/ajpa.23169.

Information and use cases:

Future Footwear Foundation stimulates progress in our understanding of human locomotion and sustainable footwear for body and environment. Inspired by the convergence of traditional wisdom and modern technology, the research project Future Footwear 2.0 at KASK School of Arts aims to bring sustainable production and individual needs closer together through 3D-printing.  This concept is materialized by the shown prototypes. The products will be on the market early 2018.

Topology optimized wrench
Topology optimized wrench Image

Technical specifications and technology highlights:

Designed using topology optimization: a method of reducing the weight of a structural part while still maintaining rigid structure. Printed using Laser Metal Deposition technology by LCV in Powder 316L stainless steel.

Information and use cases:

This wrench was designed by a student from Thomas More university college and manufactured by LCV. It shows the possibilities of light weighting a structure with the aid of topology optimization. These complex structures are hard to manufacture with subtractive manufacturing methods such as CNC milling. That’s why LCV is the perfect partner to manufacture these type of products: with their Laser Metal Deposition and cladding technology, they can manufacture large and complex parts. The LCV-Form offers high speed 3D-printing: LCV prints a 500 mm high manifold in less than 3 hours. This opens new possibilities for Near Net Shape (NNS) 3D-printing. Other applications include gears, cutting tools, punching dies, etc.

Customized toolholder and belt
Customized toolholder and belt Image

Technical specifications:

The belt is printed using a low-cost FDM printer with a polyamide filament. The belt is designed to be spiraling, in order to be able to make a longer part. The belts’ flexibility was created by applying a smart, hollow design.
The toolholder was designed to match the 3D-printed wrench. It was printed in PLA on a low-cost FDM printer.

Technology highlights:

Inexpensive and easy accessible 3D-printing technology. Polyamide gives strong, yet flexible products. The material is strong and wear-resistant.

Information and use cases:

Prototype and proof of concept; real applications are quickly built, e.g. for tooling parts, small (non-critical) machine components, etc.

Bionic hand training prosthesis
Bionic hand training prosthesis Image

Technical specifications:

The arm piece was printed in stainless steel using LBM (Laser Beam Melting, often called SLM); the part is built up layer by layer in a powder bed, on a stainless-steel substrate. After removing the powder and substrate, both parts were joined together using TIG welding. The piece was subsequently sandblasted. Most other parts of the arm were printed using FDM technology (Fused Deposition Modeling).

The materials used are ABS, PLA and SS 316L.

Technology highlights:

Myo-electrical prostheses convert potential differences in the muscles to mechanical movements. In the pre-prosthesis phase, exercise prostheses are used in the rehabilitation centre to offer the client a first form of therapy pending final prosthesis. However, this prosthetic hand is not attached to the body. Only in a second phase a preliminary prosthetic socket is made to measure. These sockets, or connections to the body, are therefore expensive and user specific.

As a result, the training prosthesis was always to be held by the client’s other hand or therapist. A specific in field design project was established to improve this period of in the prostheses training for transradial amputations. The result is the’ Actual P’: a universal myoelectric training prosthesis for people with transradial amputation. The prosthesis has a robust look-and-feel, is very light in use and consists of 80% 3D-printed parts. The innovative design, consisting of modular arm segments and an adaptable coupler, ensures a wide range of users.

Information and use cases:

From purely industrial cases up to the personalization of utensils for operators, even if they have a disability: it becomes possible with 3D-printing.

Smart driller
Smart driller Image

Technical specifications:

The drilling machine is truly an end-product (composed of mechanical parts, motors and electronics). More than 90% of the weight of the structure has been 3D-printed in titanium. Connectors are 3D-printed in plastic material. The titanium parts are printed with so-called Electron Beam Melting technology (EBM).

Technology highlights:

The advantage of using titanium 3D-printing is an optimization of the strength to weight ratio, a minimization of the number of parts to assemble, as well as an integration of numerous functions (mechanical and thermal). The specific advantage to use EBM, is to get an accurate part directly from the machine, without a need for thermal treatment. In addition, the productivity is superior to laser, which leads to lower costs.

Information and use cases:

The Smart Driller has demonstrated that 3D-printing allows to design and produce better products, and the capabilities of the Smart Driller for aerospace are superior to any other drilling machine on the market. And it comes at a very competitive price. This smart design and production can be reproduced for other industrial products or tooling. That’s what AMT-Titastar is doing for its customers in various industries.

3D-printed connectors
3D-printed connectors Image

Technical specifications:

Sirris designed all 3D-printed connectors on the Family of the Future skeletons. Prints in PA12 via Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and other technologies.

Technology highlights:

Design for Additive Manufacturing is still an expert job; Sirris fully masters this expertise and offers individual support at every step along the way, from the drawing board stage right through to prototype development and pilot tests for finished products.

SLS-printed components are strong and of very high quality. This technology is also very suitable for producing both small and larger series. As no support structures are required, a large complexity of the components can be obtained.

Information and use cases:

The combination of 3D-printing and standard parts: an efficient and modular solution that changes the way fixtures are designed and manufactured, and offers a high degree of customization and accuracy, applicable in many industries.

Male mannequin
Phits Insoles – custom orthotics Image
Phits Insoles – custom orthotics
Technical specifications: Printed in PA12 using SLS technology. Technology highlights: Phits Insoles are the world’s first and only true translation of personal dynamic gait analysis parameters in a 3D-printed ... Lees meer
3D-printed knee protection on workwear trousers Image
3D-printed knee protection on workwear trousers
Technical specifications: Centexbel printed unique knee protectors, designed by Artevelde University College, with TPU filament using FDM-technology onto workwear trousers. Technology highlights: By printing dire... Lees meer
Smart helmet with lattice structure for cushioning effect and auto-localisation Image
Smart helmet with lattice structure for cushioning effect and auto-localisation
Technical specifications: 3D-scanning of human head by Formando; 3D design and topology optimisation by Formando and Materialise; 3D-printed via HP Multi Jet Fusion in PA12 by 3iD. Technology highlights: The helm... Lees meer
Yuniku, the world’s first vision-centric 3D eyewear Image
Yuniku, the world’s first vision-centric 3D eyewear
Technical specifications: 3D-tailored eyewear is designed entirely around your face and your vision. Regular spectacles can be customized only to a certain degree. The frame and fitting are a given, and the lenses have to be adj... Lees meer
Pneumatic hand Image
Pneumatic hand
Technical specifications: The pneumatic hand by Materialise is made up of the palm and wrist area which are printed in polyamide, and the fingers which are printed in flexible TPU by KU Leuven. The hand can grip objects using co... Lees meer
Made to measure Bantu shoe, based on biomechanical principles Image
Made to measure Bantu shoe, based on biomechanical principles
Technical specifications: Selective Laser Sintering technology in Polyamide (PA). Technology highlights: Handcrafted shoe production and 3D-printing have a lot in common: its use of materials and time and its foc... Lees meer
Topology optimized wrench Image
Topology optimized wrench
Technical specifications and technology highlights: Designed using topology optimization: a method of reducing the weight of a structural part while still maintaining rigid structure. Printed using Laser Metal Deposition technol... Lees meer
Customized toolholder and belt Image
Customized toolholder and belt
Technical specifications: The belt is printed using a low-cost FDM printer with a polyamide filament. The belt is designed to be spiraling, in order to be able to make a longer part. The belts’ flexibility was created by apply... Lees meer
Bionic hand training prosthesis Image
Bionic hand training prosthesis
Technical specifications: The arm piece was printed in stainless steel using LBM (Laser Beam Melting, often called SLM); the part is built up layer by layer in a powder bed, on a stainless-steel substrate. After removing the pow... Lees meer
Smart driller Image
Smart driller
Technical specifications: The drilling machine is truly an end-product (composed of mechanical parts, motors and electronics). More than 90% of the weight of the structure has been 3D-printed in titanium. Connectors are 3D-print... Lees meer
3D-printed connectors Image
3D-printed connectors
Technical specifications: Sirris designed all 3D-printed connectors on the Family of the Future skeletons. Prints in PA12 via Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) and other technologies. Technology highlights: Design ... Lees meer